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The information contained in these resources does not necessarily reflect the views of the Partnership for Patients, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, The United States Department of Health and Human Services, nor the United States government.

Clinical/Point of Care

Clinical/Point of Care
Title Description
“Ensuring Correct Surgery” (VA National Center for Patient Safety) [PDF, 1.36MB]- Opens in a new window This pamphlet has been designed to help patients to understand what will happen before their surgery and how their doctors and nurses are taking steps to make sure that everything goes as planned.
“Post-Discharge Tool” (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF]) [PDF, 381KB]- Opens in a new window The Post-Discharge Tool was created to help patients and families take action to keep the patient’s recovery on track. The tool’s main focus is to keep patients out of the hospital. One way to do this is to make sure patients follow their care plan, and this tool can help. The NPSF post-discharge tool was written by health care professionals to help patients take the important steps to stay on the road to recovery.
“What You Can Do to Make Healthcare Safer: A Consumer Fact Sheet” (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF]) - Opens in a new window This fact sheet is designed for patients and explains how patients can ensure a safer experience with the health care system by being involved and informed about their treatment.
“Preventing Infections in the Hospital – What You Can Do: A Consumer Fact Sheet” (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF]) - Opens in a new window This fact sheet is designed for patients and provides patients with sensible principles to manage their own health care and become active partners with their health care teams.
“Safety As You Go from Hospital to Home: A Consumer Fact Sheet”  (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF]) - Opens in a new window This fact sheet is designed for patients and provides patients with a few things they can do before they go home from the hospital to make things easier.
“Pharmacy Safety and Service – What You Should Expect: A Consumer Fact Sheet” (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF]) - Opens in a new window This fact sheet is designed for patients and provides them with additional tips for medication safety.
“Checklist for Getting the Right Diagnosis” (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF])- Opens in a new window This Checklist for Getting the Right Diagnosis encourages patients to become a partner in finding the right diagnosis for them by taking an active role in working with their doctor or nurse when they are ill.
“Taking Charge of Your Healthcare: Your Path to Being an Empowered Patient” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS])- Opens in a new window

Health care providers can use this toolkit during hospital discharge to help patients leave the hospital with confidence. It includes the tools and information patients need to make a smooth transition to their next destination. Elements of the toolkit are:

  • Staying Safe When You Leave the Hospital
  • Talking to Your Doctor or Nurse
  • The Emotional Side of Healthcare: Six Tips for Talking to Your Doctor
  • The Emotional Side of Healthcare: Six Tips for Talking to Your Doctor (Condensed Poster Version)
  • Communicating with Patients and Families for Smooth, Safe Transitions
  • Glossary of Terms
“Staying Safe When You Leave the Hospital” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS]) [PDF, 812KB]- Opens in a new window The “Staying Safe When You Leave the Hospital” bi-fold booklet is an element of CAPS’ Taking Charge of Your Healthcare: Your Path to Being an Empowered Patient toolkit that guides patients and family members to collect their thoughts and ask the right questions. By using this tool, they will have what they need to know and do before leaving the hospital in an easy to use and update format.
“Talking to Your Doctor or Nurse” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS]) [PDF, 293KB]- Opens in a new window The “Talking to Your Doctor or Nurse” list is an element of CAPS’ Taking Charge of Your Healthcare: Your Path to Being an Empowered Patient toolkit that gives patients and their advocates advice and tips for making the most of their conversations with their doctor or nurse, wherever such conversations occur.
“The Emotional Side of Healthcare: Six Tips for Talking to Your Doctor” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS]) [PDF, 335KB]- Opens in a new window “The Emotional Side of Healthcare: Six Tips for Talking to Your Doctor” is a trifold brochure and is an element of CAPS’ Taking Charge of Your Healthcare: Your Path to Being an Empowered Patient toolkit that presents six strategies for coping with conversations that often feel stressful for patients and families. This can also serve as a reminder or educational tool for healthcare team members to raise their sensitivity to the emotional realities patients bring with them as they talk to their doctor or nurse.
“The Emotional Side of Healthcare: Six Tips for Talking to Your Doctor” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS]) [PDF, 495KB]- Opens in a new window This is a condensed poster version of "The Emotional Side of Healthcare: Six Tips for Talking to your Doctor" brochure that lists the six tips for easy reference.
“Communicating with Patients and Families for Smooth, Safe Transitions” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS]) [PDF, 199KB]- Opens in a new window The “Communicating with Patients and Families for Smooth, Safe Transitions” document is an element of CAPS’ Taking Charge of Your Healthcare: Your Path to Being an Empowered Patient toolkit that explains how patients and families often feel during this stressful time, and how healthcare providers can open lines of communication. It can be used by hospital training personnel to lay a foundation for understanding if the toolkit is rolled out organization wide.
“Glossary of Terms” (Consumers Advancing Patient Safety [CAPS]) [PDF, 232]- Opens in a new window The “Glossary of Terms” is an element of CAPS’ Taking Charge of Your Healthcare: Your Path to Being an Empowered Patient toolkit and is a listing of words that CAPS patient advisors suggested would be helpful for consumers to help them understand terms that may arise during the transition out of the hospital.
“Speak Up: Five Things You Can Do To Prevent Infection” (The Joint Commission)- Opens in a new window The “Speak Up: Five Things You Can Do To Prevent Infection” poster provides patients with five easy things they can do to fight the spread of infection.
“Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care” (The Joint Commission)- Opens in a new window The “Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care” brochure encourages patients to help make their care safer by being an active, involved and informed member of their health care team.
“Speak Up: Help Avoid Mistakes With Your Medicines” (The Joint Commission) [PDF, 584KB]- Opens in a new window The “Speak Up: Help Avoid Mistakes With Your Medicines” brochure has questions and answers to help patients prevent mistakes with their medicines.
“Speak Up: Reduce Your Risk of Falling” (The Joint Commission)- Opens in a new window The “Speak Up: Reduce Your Risk of Falling” brochure includes tips and actions patients can take to reduce their risk of falling, whether at home or in a medical facility.
“Patient Safety: Ten Things You Can Do to Be a Safe Patient” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]) This link on the CDC website provides patients with ten things they can do to be a safe patient. By following these 10 steps, patients can help make healthcare safer and help prevent healthcare-associated infections.
“How to be Safe While Receiving Medical Care” (By Victoria Nahum and in collaboration with Safe Care Campaign, Kimberly-Clark, The Joint Commission Speak Up™ Campaign, The Patient Channel and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC])- Opens in a new window This book was written to help patients and their families understand what they can do to prevent medical harm from occurring while in the process of receiving care.
“Your Discharge Planning Checklist: For patients and their caregivers preparing to leave a hospital, nursing home, or other care setting” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services [CMS]) [PDF, 182KB]- Opens in a new window This checklist is designed for patients and their caregivers preparing to leave a hospital, nursing home or other care setting.
“Keeping Kidney Patients Safe Posters” (Keeping Kidney Patients Safe, a joint project of the Renal Physicians Association and the Forum of End Stage Renal Disease Networks)- Opens in a new window Patient safety posters can grab staff attention and remind them to remain vigilant to potential adverse patient safety events and errors. The posters can be easily downloaded and printed for distribution or display. Posters are available on the following topics: Patient Safety Dialyzer, Patient Safety Falls, Patient Safety Hand Hygiene, Patient Safety Medication, Patient Safety Adherence and Venous Needle Dislodgement.
“Dialysis Safety: What Patients Need to Know” (Keeping Kidney Patients Safe, a joint project of the Renal Physicians Association and the Forum of End Stage Renal Disease Networks)- Opens in a new window The Dialysis Safety: What Patients Need to Know brochure gives patients ideas for talking to their health care team, basic information about six key areas where mistakes can be prevented, and tips for keeping them safe at each visit to the dialysis facility.
“20 Tips to Help Prevent Medical Errors” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ]) - Opens in a new window Medical errors can occur anywhere in the health care system: In hospitals, clinics, surgery centers, doctors' offices, nursing homes, pharmacies, and patients' homes. Errors can involve medicines, surgery, diagnosis, equipment, or lab reports. These tips tell patients what they can do to get safer care.
“The Patient's Checklist: 10 Simple Hospital Checklists to Keep you Safe, Sane & Organized” (By Elizabeth Bailey)- Opens in a new window

Every year, thirty-five million Americans become hospital patients and more than fifty million surgeries are performed. Each of those patients--whatever their resources--confronts the same obstacles to good, safe care.

From a trip to the emergency room to open heart surgery, all patients can experience not just perplexing and impersonal care but serious communication and safety issues that can put them at risk. Based on firsthand knowledge, Elizabeth Bailey has created ten checklists that provide a simple system for better managing, monitoring, and participating in your hospital care. These checklists can play a big role in guarding against error and promoting compassion in care, so that a patient is not only “cured” but also “healed.”

“Safe & Sound in the Hospital: Must-Have Checklists and Tools for Your Loved One's Care” (By Karen Curtiss and CampaignZERO)- Opens in a new window One-third of all hospital patients are harmed or killed by accident every year in American hospitals -- about 13 million patients. This is an invaluable book designed to give the utmost attention to the patient and their caregivers so that hospital mistakes don't happen.
“CampaignZERO Checklists” (CampaignZERO) [PDF, 1.26MB]- Opens in a new window This free, printable booklet of all the CampaignZERO Checklists are designed to be kept at your fingertips for times when a friend or family member is in the hospital and needs your help. Every patient should have someone with them 24/7 and you want to be prepared. This booklet includes checklists on preventing the following: Falls and Fractures, Infections, Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI), Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP), Pressure Ulcers, Surgical Errors, Medication Errors, Blood Clots (embolisms), as well as General Tips for managing your loved one's care.
“Why the Last Weeks of Pregnancy Count” (March of Dimes)- Opens in a new window This bilingual brochure tells women why it's important not to schedule an induction or c-section for non-medical reasons before 39 weeks of pregnancy. Describes the baby's growth and development in the last few weeks of pregnancy. Includes questions a woman can ask her provider about scheduling delivery.
“Late Preterm Brain Development Card” (March of Dimes)- Opens in a new window This card is for health care providers to use during discussions with patients who are considering elective induction or cesarean section before 39 weeks for convenience. This laminated card illustrates the differences in brain development at 35 and 40 weeks of pregnancy. Teaching points on the back give facts about the importance of going full term.
“Preparing for a Doctor’s Visit” (Partnership for Healthcare Excellence)- Opens in a new window In this video, Dr. Bob Klugman from UMass Memorial Medical Center gives consumers simple tips for making the most of their time at the doctor.
“Educational Resources For Patients” (Clot Connect)- Opens in a new window Clot Connect® (clotconnect.org) is a national collaborative outreach project of the Blood Clot Outreach Program at the Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Clot Connect® has brochures, educational handouts, videos and other resources available for blood clot survivors and their families that provide information and support to manage the effects of a blood clot and to prevent future clots.
“The Daily Plan” (The Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] National Center for Patient Safety)- Opens in a new window This initiative enhances patient safety by involving patients in their care. A single document is provided to them that outlines what can be expected on a specific day of hospitalization. The Daily Plan® is essentially a road map that lets patients see, in black and white, what's going to happen to them on a particular day.
“The Empowered Patient® Hospital Guide For Patients and Families” (The Empowered Patient Coalition) - Opens in a new window This guide is designed to help patients and families prepare for the issues involved in hospital care.
“The Empowered Patient® Journal” (The Empowered Patient Coalition) - Opens in a new window The Patient Journal serves as a companion Journal for the Hospital Guide For Patients and Families and is made up of a series of custom forms designed to assist patients and families in organizing their medical information and their own observations.
“The Empowered Patient® Pocket Guides” (The Empowered Patient Coalition)- Opens in a new window The Empowered Patient Pocket Guides are portable reference tools to assist patients in participating in their medical care. Accordion-fold booklets the size of a smartphone provide the practical information patients and caregivers need - right at their fingertips.
“The Empowered Patient® Quick Reference Guide - Factsheets & Checklists” (The Empowered Patient Coalition)- Opens in a new window The Quick Reference Guide fact sheets and checklists give patients the specific tools, resources and questions they need to become capable and confident members of their healthcare teams.
“Fact Sheets” (The Empowered Patient Coalition)- Opens in a new window The Empowered Patient Coalition has over 30 fact sheets that are available for patients and families to download for free. Topics include “Choosing a Doctor,” “Working with Hospital Staff” and “Care At Home After Surgery.”
“Your 1, 3, 6, and 12 Month Plan to Becoming an Empowered Patient” (The Empowered Patient Coalition) [PDF, 291KB]- Opens in a new window The Empowered Patient Coalition’s Your 1, 3, 6, and 12 Month Plan to Becoming an Empowered Patient is a year-long plan to start patients and their advocates on the right path to high-quality information and true patient-centered care. The plan includes the Empowered Patient Coalition’s customized chart for understanding the hospital hierarchy.
“The Empowered Patient: Hundreds of Life-Saving Facts, Action Steps and Strategies You Need to Know” (by Dr. Julia A. Hallisy)- Opens in a new window The Empowered Patient: Hundreds of Life-Saving Facts, Action Steps and Strategies You Need to Know is a 50,000-word book that enables patients and their loved ones to successfully navigate complex medical delivery systems. Ten chapters focus on numerous patients' rights and patient safety issues. Each chapter identifies a different health care issue and provides easily comprehensible and very specific strategies to empower all medical care recipients.
“SBAR Outpatient Communication Technique” (The Empowered Patient Coalition) [PDF,639KB]- Opens in a new window The Empowered Patient Coalition developed an outpatient SBAR form (Situation, Background, Assessment, Request) for patients to use when communicating with providers in person, by phone, or via email. The form will help patients and caregivers organize their thoughts and questions to keep a record of important observations and instructions.
“Warning Signs of the Rapidly Declining Patient” (The Empowered Patient Coalition) - Opens in a new window Failure to rescue -- the failure of healthcare professionals to recognize and act upon the signs of a patient in crisis -- is a leading cause of unexpected deaths in hospitals. Studies have shown that the overwhelming majority of hospital cardiac arrests are preceded by a period of increasing patient instability that may be overlooked by busy or inexperienced healthcare workers.  This warning list can help you know when to alert your healthcare provider that your patient needs urgent attention.

Policy/Design

Policy/Design
Title Description
“The Universal Patient Compact” (National Patient Safety Foundation [NPSF]) - Opens in a new window The Universal Patient Compact™ is a statement of principles established by NPSF to help create and maintain strong partnerships between patients and providers. NPSF believes that this partnership is critical to the delivery of safe and high quality care. The Compact’s principles are important to forming a patient-and-family-centered care process that respects the rights of patients and providers.
“2012 SAFE CARE Patient Safety Education Program” (Safe Care Campaign, Kimberly-Clark, The Joint Commission Speak Up™ Campaign, The Patient Channel and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC])- Opens in a new window This completely turnkey program puts important patient education information directly into the hands of patients and their families when they need it most. It requires absolutely no staff time obligation or training to integrate these potentially lifesaving resources into your hospital or other medical care facilities patient education program.
“The Care Transitions Program” (Division of Health Care Policy and Research at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine)- Opens in a new window During a 4-week program, patients with complex care needs receive specific tools, are supported by a Transitions Coach®, and learn self-management skills to ensure their needs are met during the transition from hospital to home.
“Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide” (Planetree, Inc. and the Picker Institute, Inc.)- Opens in a new window Planetree joined forces with the Picker Institute to develop a resource that would translate patient-centered care from a nebulous concept into a concrete one.  The Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide reflects the collective wisdom of organizations implementing patient-centered care at an advanced level, as well as the experiences of those whose efforts have been hindered by any number of barriers.
“Long-Term Care Improvement Guide” (Planetree, Inc. and the Picker Institute, Inc.) [PDF, 8.89MB]- Opens in a new window The Long-Term Care Improvement Guide is a practical resource intended to support continuing care communities in their efforts to bring about culture change. Like its predecessor, the Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide, the Guide has been shaped by the perspectives of patients—in this case, patients in long- and short-term care—and their families, as well as those of the staff and leadership of the skilled nursing homes, independent and assisted living facilities and rehabilitation centers where so many of the elderly live.
“Patient Activation Measure® (PAM®)” (Insignia Health)- Opens in a new window The Patient Activation Measure® (PAM®) assessment gauges the knowledge, skills and confidence essential to managing one’s own health and healthcare. More than 100 health research studies from around the world document the importance of activation and its relationship to behaviors critical to improving health and reducing healthcare utilization. Hundreds of important characteristics have been mapped to activation levels.  This research informs Insignia’s health activation model, which today supports over 60 organizations and their medication adherence, disease management, medical home, wellness promotion and care transition programs.
“Partnering with Patients and Families to Design a Patient- and Family-Centered Health Care System: Recommendations and Promising Practices” (Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care [IPFCC]) [PDF, 3.3MB]- Opens in a new window The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to key constituents in health care—patients and families, providers, administrators, educators, researchers, advocates, and funders—for advancing patient- and family-centered care, and specifically for creating partnerships with patients and families in quality improvement and health care redesign. Many of the report’s recommendations are illustrated by examples drawn from health facilities and other organizations that are making exemplary progress in partnering with patients and families.
“Motivational Interviewing in Health Care: Helping Patients Change Behavior” (By Stephen Rollnick, William R. Miller, and Christopher C. Butler)- Opens in a new window Written specifically for health care professionals, this book presents powerful tools to enhance communication with patients and guide them in making choices to improve their health. Engaging dialogues and vignettes bring to life the core skills of motivational interviewing (MI) and show how to incorporate this brief evidence-based approach into any health care setting. Appendices include MI training resources and publications on specific medical conditions.
“5-Diamond Patient Safety Program” (ESRD Network)- Opens in a new window This program is designed to assist dialysis facilities to improve both staff and patient awareness of specific patient safety areas, promoting patient safety values, and building a culture of patient safety in every dialysis facility.
“Patient Safety: Achieving a New Standard for Care” (Institute of Medicine [IOM])- Opens in a new window This is a report released by the IOM that describes a detailed plan to facilitate the development of data standards applicable to the collection, coding, and classification of patient safety information.
“Hospital Quality: Ingredients for Success-Overview and Lessons Learned” (The Commonwealth Fund) [PDF, 230KB]- Opens in a new window Hospitals across the country are searching for ways to improve quality of care and promote effective quality improvement strategies. This research study, by members of the economic and social research institute, identifies and describes the key factors that contributed to the success of four high-performing hospitals across the country. The findings from this study offer guidance and action steps to help hospitals move in the right direction.
“How-to Guide: Improving Transitions from the Hospital to Post-Acute Care Settings to Reduce Avoidable Rehospitalizations” (Institute for Healthcare Improvement [IHI])- Opens in a new window This How-to Guide is designed to support hospital-based teams and their community partners in codesigning and reliably implementing improved care processes to ensure that patients who have been discharged from the hospital have an ideal transition to the next setting of care (such as a primary care practice, home care, or a skilled nursing facility).
“Leadership Guide to Patient Safety” (Institute for Healthcare Improvement [IHI])- Opens in a new window This paper shares the experience of senior leaders who have decided to address patient safety and quality as a strategic imperative within their organizations. It presents what can be done to make the dramatic changes that are necessary to ensure that patients are not harmed by the very care systems they trust will heal them. This paper presents eight steps that are recommended for leaders to follow to achieve patient safety and high reliability in their organizations.
“Pediatric Patient Safety in the Emergency Department” (Joint Commission and the American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP])- Opens in a new window

This book will help leaders at hospitals and emergency care centers where pediatric patients are treated to transition, integrate, and sustain successful practices to care for pediatric patients in their emergency departments. The book includes examples, discussions, strategies, tools, and tips that will help health care providers improve the quality of their pediatric patient care by focusing on the following:

  • Leadership
  • Communication
  • Patient and Family-Centered Environment of Care
  • Medication Safety
  • Infection Prevention and Control
  • Patient Assessment, Diagnostic Studies and Treatment
  • Caring for Children with Special Health Care Needs
  • Disaster Management
“Elimination of Non-medically Indicated (Elective) Deliveries Before 39 Weeks Gestational Age; Quality Improvement Toolkit” (March of Dimes, in collaboration with California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative [CMQCC], and the California Department of Health, Maternal Child and Adolescent Health Division)- Opens in a new window

In order to support hospitals in eliminating non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks, March of Dimes, California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC), and the California Department of Health, Maternal Child and Adolescent Health Division collaborated on the development of a quality improvement toolkit.  The new toolkit, entitled Elimination of Non-medically Indicated (Elective) Deliveries Before 39 Weeks Gestational Age; Quality Improvement Toolkit includes:

  • Making the Case:  A comprehensive literature review about the importance of eliminating elective deliveries before 39 weeks.
  • Implementation: A step-by-step guide to assist hospital leaders with implementation efforts.
  • Data Collection and Quality Improvement: A guide for measuring and tracking QI effectiveness over time.
  • Clinician and Patient Education: Educational tools for clinicians and staff about consequences of early elective delivery; educational tools for patients about the importance of the last weeks of pregnancy.
  • Appendices: Sample Forms, Hospital Case Studies, QI Implementation Tools, Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Methodology, Implementation Resources and References.
“HBWW: Preventing Preterm Births through Community-based Interventions: An Implementation Manual” (March of Dimes)- Opens in a new window

Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait® (HBWW) is a collaborative initiative to eliminate preventable preterm births. The purpose of the HBWW manual is to provide tools and resources for program implementation in new sites. The manual is organized around the five core components (the 5 Ps) of the HBWW model:

  • Partnerships and collaborations
  • Provider initiatives
  • Patient support
  • Public engagement
  • Measuring progress
Partnership Opportunities for Hospitals and/or Hospital Engagement Networks Regarding Non-Medically Indicated Deliveries Before 39 Weeks” (March of Dimes) [PDF, 823.76 KB] The March of Dimes is driving an initiative to eliminate non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks (early elective deliveries). We have resources to help hospitals implement a quality improvement (QI) program; patient education materials; continuing professional education opportunities; and a consumer awareness campaign that includes advertising and media opportunities for hospitals and/or Hospital Engagement Networks.
“Advancing the Practice of Patient- and Family-Centered Care in Hospitals: How to Get Started...” (Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care [IPFCC]) [PDF, 1.94MB]- Opens in a new window The Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care is pleased to offer guidance for how to get started in advancing the practice of patient- and family-centered care and in creating effective partnerships with patients and families with this new publication, Advancing the Practice of Patient- and Family-Centered Care in Hospitals: How to Get Started...
“Partnering with Patients and Families to Enhance Safety and Quality: A Mini Toolkit” (Institute for Patient- and Family-Centered Care [IPFCC]) [PDF, 250KB]- Opens in a new window

There are countless ways that patients and families can serve as advisors to enhance quality and safety, redesign systems of care, and educate health care professionals and other staff, students, and trainees about safety. Some are formal and ongoing; others are time limited and informal. All are necessary to ensure that care is safe and truly responsive to patient and family needs, priorities, goals, and values. This Mini Tool Kit contains a myriad of materials for use in partnering with patients and families to enhance safety and quality, including:

  • Patients & Families as Advisors in Enhancing Safety and Quality: Broadening Our Vision
  • Patient and Family Advisors: Sample Application Form
  • Patient Safety Champions: Their Roles in Developing and Supporting Partnerships with Patients and Families
  • Tips for Group Leaders and Facilitators on Involving Patients and Families on Committees and Task Forces
  • Applying Patient- and Family-Centered Concepts to Rapid Response Teams
  • Selected Resources for Partnering with Patients and Families In Patient Safety
"Intermountain Primary Children’s Medical Center Case Study” (DOC) - Opens in a new window Case Study on Family Advisory Council from Intermountain Primary Children's Medical Center in Salt Lake City, Utah, describing former hospital CEO Joe Horton's vision to achieve a more patient- and family-centered culture of care.
Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital Family Advisory Case Study” (DOC) - Opens in a new window The Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital Family Advisory case study details how the hospital set up and implemented their Family Advisory Council.

Governance

Governance
Title Description
“How-to Guide: Governance Leadership (Get Boards on Boards)” (Institute for Healthcare Improvement [IHI])- Opens in a new window This How-to Guide recommends that boards of trustees in all hospitals undertake six key governance leadership activities to improve quality and reduce harm in their hospitals. The guide was initially developed as part of IHI's 5 Million Lives Campaign.
“The Board’s Role in Quality and Safety: 7 Key Governance Questions” (Providence Health & Services)- Opens in a new window This presentation reviews seven key questions that a hospital board of directors should ask when seeking to sharpen its focus on quality and safety.
“Guidelines for Using Patient Stories with Boards of Directors” (Delnor-Community Hospital)- Opens in a new window These guidelines describe how to use patient stories effectively to engage hospital boards of directors in quality improvement work.
“Questions to Ask When Forming a Board Quality Committee” (The Reinertsen Group)- Opens in a new window This list of questions, developed by Jim Reinertsen, MD, is designed to help think through the key decisions involved with forming a Board Quality Committee and formalizing the processes by which the committee will do its work.

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